Valentine's Day Weekend: Sea Lion Kisses And Breakfast With The Sharks!

January 30, 2008

These are no ordinary Valentines!

The Oregon Coast Aquarium is offering a unique way to say, “I Love You.” Sea lion kisses are featured during the Valentine’s Day sea lion encounters February 14 and Breakfast with the Sharks is offered on President’s Day weekend after Valentine’s Day. On these special encounters, visitors get up close to the ocean’s creatures and learn about them from Aquarium staff members who care for them.

Sea Lion Kisses

Visitors go behind the scenes at the Aquarium for a sea lion encounter where they learn about the natural history and conservation of these beautiful animals. They will learn about the basics of sea lion care from marine mammalogists, get up close to our sea lions and get a kiss from Lea, our friendliest pinniped. Visitors will receive a photo of their sea lion kiss. Two Sea Lion Encounters are offered, with the first one from 10-11 am and the second one from 1 to 2 pm. Cost: $45.00 for non-members, $40.00 for members (does not include Aquarium admission). Open to age 8 and up. Space is limited and reservations are required. Register by calling 541-867-3474, ext. 2313.

Breakfast with the Sharks

Visitors enjoy “Breakfast with the Sharks” Saturday or Sunday, Feb. 16 and 17, from 8:30-10:00 am and watch as the sharks are fed through the large acrylic window in Passages of the Deep. This unique opportunity allows visitors to enter the Aquarium before it opens and enjoy a delicious, hot breakfast buffet while watching a shark feeding and learning more about these extraordinary creatures by an Aquarium marine biologist. After breakfast, enjoy a leisurely stroll through the Aquarium. Cost: $25.00 non-members, $20.00 for members (includes Aquarium admission). Space is limited and reservations are required. Register by calling 541-867-3474, ext. 2313.

Breakfast with the Sharks shows how sharks are important members of their ocean habitats, unlike the man-eating monsters portrayed in the movies. Sharks and their ancestors have presided over the seas for nearly 400 million years, but in the wild today, shark populations are suffering from human activity. Through habitat destruction and over fishing, we have become more dangerous to sharks than they are to us. All of the sharks exhibited at the Oregon Coast Aquarium are species native to Oregon’s coastal waters.

Back